New killer whale discovered by Scientists

A type D killer whale. Scientists are waiting for test results from a tissue sample, which could give them the DNA evidence to prove the new type is a distinct species. (Paul Tixier/CEBC CNRS/MNHN Paris/Associated Press)

For decades, there were tales from fishermen and tourists, even lots of photos, of a mysterious killer whale that just didn’t look like all the others. But scientists had never seen one.

Now they have.

An international team of researchers found a couple dozen distinctly different orcas roaming in the oceans off southern Chile in January. Scientists are waiting for DNA tests from a tissue sample but think they may have found a distinct species.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration felt confident enough to trumpet the discovery of the long-rumored killer whale on Thursday. Some outside experts were more cautious, acknowledging the whales are different, but saying they’d wait for the test results to answer the species question.

This composite photo shows the potentially new type D killer whale, left, and the more commonly recognizable on the right. (Paul Tixier/CEBC CNRS/MNHN Paris/Associated Press, Chris Park/Associated Press)

“This is the most different looking killer whale I’ve ever seen,” said Robert Pitman, an NOAA marine ecologist in San Diego. He was part of the team that spotted the orcas off Cape Horn at the tip of South America.

How different? The whale’s signature large white eye patch is tiny on these new guys, barely noticeable. Their heads are a bit more rounded and less sleek than normal killer whales and their dorsal fins are narrower and pointed.

They likely mostly eat fish, not marine mammals like seals, as other killer whales do, Pitman said. Fishermen have complained about how good they are at poaching off fishing lines, snatching a 200-pound fish a

Pitman said they are so different they probably can’t breed with other killer whales and are likely a new species. At six to 7½ metres, they are slightly smaller than most killer whales. In the Southern Hemisphere, killer whales are considered all one species, classified in types A through C. This one is called type D or subantarctic killer whale.

Michael McGowen, the marine mammal curator at the Smithsonian, said calling it a new species without genetic data may be premature. Still, he said, “I think it’s pretty remarkable that there are still many things out there in the ocean like a huge killer whale that we don’t know about.

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